Bonsai Tonight

Young summer buds on black and red pine bonsai

Posted in Bonsai Development by Jonas Dupuich on June 29, 2012

Summer buds start forming on black and red pines within days of decandling. I try to wire trees that need it before summer buds appear to avoid damaging them. What do I do when small buds appear but I still want to wire a tree? When I’m feeling ambitious, I go ahead and wire with care. Far more often, I wait until fall.

Here are some photos of newly formed buds on black and red pines.

Japanese black pine - 10 days after decandling

Summer buds on Japanese black pine – 10 days after decandling

Japanese black pine - 10 days after decandling

Black pine – 10 days after decandling

Cork bark black pine - 10 days after decandling

Summer buds on corkbark Japanese black pine – 10 days after decandling

Cork bark black pine - 10 days after decandling

Corkbark black pine – 10 days after decandling

Red pine buds - 18 days after decandling

Summer buds on Japanese red pine – 18 days after decandling

Red pine buds - 18 days after decandling

Red pine – 18 days after decandling

Some techniques call for thinning buds before they fully develop. I’ve done this on occasion, but usually large numbers of buds indicate that a branch is too strong and needs to be removed. Over the next few weeks I’ll continue to monitor my pines and see if thinning will be required when the buds get a little bigger.

2 Responses

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  1. carl said, on July 2, 2012 at 3:12 pm

    What causes those yellow spots on the top of the pine needles, is it wind scorch or maybe over feeding ?
    my mugo pine has the same yellow needle tips on some parts of the tree.
    I follow your blog all the time.
    cheers

  2. Jonas Dupuich said, on July 2, 2012 at 7:07 pm

    Hi Carl, Great question – I’ve been wondering myself. My best guess is that the yellow here is caused by fungus, but a variety of other culprits also cause yellowness from mineral deficiencies to over feeding or watering. I’m guessing fungus based on the uneven distribution of the discoloration, but I can’t say for sure. Thanks for the note!


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