Bonsai Tonight

More from the Pacific Rim Bonsai Collection

Posted in Excursions by Jonas Dupuich on September 28, 2012

Tuesday, I posted photos of trees from Weyerhaeuser’s Pacific Rim Bonsai Collection that were planted in less formal pots – ovals, a round pot, and slabs. Here are some of the trees on display in more formal pots – rectangles, a square, and a six-sided pot.

Chinese Juniper on Sierra Juniper

Chinese Juniper on Sierra Juniper

Korean Hornbeam

Korean Hornbeam

Korean Hornbeam

Korean Hornbeam

Golden Atlas Cedar

Golden Atlas Cedar

Japanese Red Pine

Japanese Red Pine

Trident maple

Trident Maple

Formosan juniper

Formosan Juniper

Japanese Black Pine

Japanese Black Pine

Tucker Oak

Tucker Oak

Deadwood

Deadwood detail

Corkbark Japanese Black Pine

Corkbark Japanese Black Pine

Formosan juniper

Formosan Juniper

Western Hemlock

Western Hemlock

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8 Responses

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  1. Kiran Ravindra said, on September 28, 2012 at 2:03 pm

    Jonas, these are some incredible trees. I can only hope to someday be as fortunate as you to visit so many incredible places and care for such a large collection of your own.

    I’m a sixteen year old kid and I have five trees. You’re extremely lucky to live in the Bay Area and to have so many clubs and societies around you. There isn’t really anything here in SC…

    Have you visited the bonsai exhibit at Chicago Botanic Gardens? I went about two months ago, and it was pretty incredible. Keep up the great work and posts! I’m a longtime reader and enjoy every last entry.

  2. Jonas Dupuich said, on September 28, 2012 at 2:11 pm

    Thanks Kiran! I have yet to visit the Chicago Botanic Gardens – I’ll add it to my list.

  3. Kiran Ravindra said, on September 28, 2012 at 2:42 pm

    It was really quite nice. Something especially nice if you’re going through Chicago and have a little while there. One could maybe even pull it off with a long airport layover.

    I actually have a question for you regarding one of my trees, here is my root-over rock trident maple: http://i.imgur.com/pBy1M.jpg

    I’d like to wire it this winter to have some defined foliage pads, much like those seen in this tree from Chicago: http://i.imgur.com/C9JOC.jpg

    I have not, however, seen stratified, dense, defined foliage pads on a shohin; do you think this is possible? Thanks!

  4. Jonas Dupuich said, on September 28, 2012 at 5:04 pm

    Hi Kiran – It’s definitely possible to get great ramification on small tridents like this. It takes a lot of work during the growing season, but after a few years the tree should be well on its way.

  5. Kiran Ravindra said, on September 29, 2012 at 12:48 pm

    Awesome, thanks! That’s not a very good photo of my shohin but I hope you get the idea.

    Have you considered adding a part to the site where we could share photos of our trees and have you critique them or give styling advice? I think that would be very neat!

  6. Anthropogen said, on September 30, 2012 at 3:07 am

    Fantastic site. I have a question you may be able to help me with.. I am looking for general guidelines, references, or criteria (if applicable) regarding how bonsai trees are traditionally displayed. Any insight you could provide would be greatly appreciated. I’ll follow your blog and tune in periodically.

  7. Jonas Dupuich said, on September 30, 2012 at 11:42 am

    Hi Spencer – Good question, I don’t know of a great resource about display. I’ve come across individual articles in Japanese magazines, but have yet to find a solid resource on the topic. Exhibit books from Kokufu or similar shows offer good examples of well-displayed trees and make a good starting point. I’ll be sure to share anything I find on the topic. Thanks!

  8. Jonas Dupuich said, on September 30, 2012 at 11:53 am

    Hi Kiran, There are some great forums out there – check out Bonsai Study Group, home of active discussions from experts and hobbyists all over the world.


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