Bonsai Tonight

Bonsai apprentices online

Posted in Reflections by Jonas Dupuich on June 7, 2011

Bonsai apprentices online

Like many bonsai enthusiasts, I’ve long dreamed about studying bonsai in Japan in a formal apprenticeship. After hearing tales from Kathy Shaner, Boon Manakitivipart, and Michael Hagedorn, I’m both excited by, and somewhat afraid of, all that the experience entails.

Recently three more bonsai students began apprenticeships in Japan: Tim Gardner, Peter Tea, and Tyler Sherrod. Tim is studying with Tohru Suzuki at Daiju-en in Okazaki. Toshinori Sukuki, Tohru’s father, trained Yasuo Mitsuya, Kathy’s teacher, and Kihachiro Kamiya, Boon’s teacher.

Peter is studying with Junichiro Tanaka, owner of Aichien Bonsai Nursery in Nagoya. Tanaka studied bonsai with Tohru Suzuki.

Tyler is studying bonsai with Shinji Suzuki in Obuse, near Nagano. Michael Hagedorn studied bonsai with Shinji Suzuki, and Matt Reel continues to study with Suzuki. Shinji Suzuki studied with Motosuke Hamano, Masahiko Kimura’s teacher.

Somehow, both Peter Tea and Tim Gardner have found time to write about their adventures and share them online. Their blogs are among my favorite bonsai sites as they contain great photos and excellent advice on bonsai training and care. I recommend them both highly.

Here are some photos from Peter’s Aichien Journal (photos by Peter Tea):

Aichien

Japanese black pine

Aichien

Japanese five needle pine

Aichien

Japanese maple

And here are some photos from Tim’s Daiju-en Journal (photos by Tim Gardner):

Daiju En

Tohru Suzuki working on a Japanese black pine

Daiju En

One of the greatest collections of pines on earth – Daiju-en

Daiju En

More pines from Daiju-en

Peter, Tim, and Tyler – I wish you all the best of luck. Ganbatte!

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Evaluating bonsai at Bay Island Bonsai meeting

Posted in Reflections by Jonas Dupuich on May 10, 2011

Evaluating bonsai at Bay Island Bonsai meeting

Learning to evaluate bonsai is a big part of the Bay Island Bonsai experience. If one doesn’t understand a tree’s good and bad points, it’s hard to improve the tree, and it’s hard to know how much to pay for it.

We’ve been using a simple form designed by Boon for over 10 years. The idea is that it’s easier to evaluate part of a tree than it is to synthesize all of a tree’s good and bad points into a single measure. At our recent May meeting, we looked closely at two trees: a Tsukumo cypress and a Japanese black pine.

Tsukumo cypress

Tree #1 – Tsukumo cypress

Japanese black pine

Tree #2 – Japanese black pine – exposed root style

At a glance, the Tsukumo cypress is the more impressive tree. It is full, healthy, and has a nice silhouette. The pine looks like it has a way to go before we’ll see it in our exhibit. The judging, however, tells a different story. I’ll save you the math and provide averages for the forms that appear below.

Tree #1 – Tsukumo cypress
Trunk 5
Branches 3
Rootage 3
Pot Selection 3
Aesthetics 3
Total 17

Tree #2 – Japanese black pine
Trunk 8
Branches 3
Rootage  4
Pot Selection 4
Aesthetics 3
Total 22

After marking our forms, we reconvene and publicly discuss the results. The corrections on several of the cards below reflect the broader consensus.

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

Judging form

New members often have trouble with this atomized approach to evaluating trees. Over time, however, member scores tend to move toward the mean. These evaluation exercices prepare us for our annual exhibit. At the exhibit, members select the best tree in each class. Winning trees receive Members’ Choice Awards. More importantly, the skills we gain from learning to evaluate bonsai help us guide our own trees toward exhibit.

A complementary exercise at BIB meetings involves creating practice displays and bringing trees to share with others in the hopes that we can together determine whether or not a tree is ready for exhibit.

Satsuki azalea

Satsuki azalea

Satsuki azalea

Satsuki azalea blooms

Satsuki azalea

Satsuki azalea blooms

This azalea is planted in what the Japanese often refer to as a “white” pot. Age has darkened the pot to the point that it evokes grey now more than white. It’s a beautiful pot that suits the azalea well.

“White” pot

We were also treated to an attractive hinoki bonsai. I’ve been partial to hinoki bonsai for years. They have wonderfully dark green foliage and their well-composed branch pads can reveal age well.

Hinoki cypress

Hinoki cypress

Hinoki cypress - branch detail

Hinoki cypress – branch pad detail

I’m still unsure about which of my own trees will make it to exhibit this year. I’m hoping I’ll have a better idea by the end of summer. If I had to decide today – well, it would be a hard decision.

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GSBF Collection North

Posted in Reflections by Jonas Dupuich on March 4, 2011

GSBF Collection North

After visiting the GSBF Mammoth Fundraiser last weekend, I stopped by the Bonsai Garden at Lake Merritt. Spring is a great time to visit the garden as the quince are in bloom and the maples are just starting to leaf out. It’s also a good time of year to see the blooms that make the winter hazel (Corylopsis spicata) unique.

Corylopsis bloom

Winter hazel blossoms

Corylopsis

Winter hazel (Corylopsis spicata)

The garden is home to the largest pomegranate bonsai I’ve seen. According to the garden’s website, the tree was “Dug from an old orchard (thought to have been planted in late 1800s) in Lodi by Vince and Kathy Owyoung. They donated the tree, Sept. 2002. Styled by Seiji Shiba. A glass jar was found embedded in the trunk. Potted at the Garden, Aug. 5, 2008.”

Pomegranate

Pomegranate (Punica granatum)

Pomegranate - trunk detail

Pomegranate – trunk detail

A number of Japanese maples had just started to leaf out. The new foliage is beautiful.

Japanese maple

Japanese maple

Japanese maple

Japanese maple foliage

Japanese maple

Japanese maple – note bamboo used to arrange trunks

Japanese maple

Japanese maple grove

I’ve watched the California juniper below develop for close to 15 years – it has an interesting curve to the trunk. From the website: “Collected in 1954 from the high desert region near Palmdale in southern California, this tree was styled about 1964.”

California juniper

California juniper

The fruit on the citrus below puts the tree in perspective. Every visitor that passed by stopped for a closer look.

Orange

Orange

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GSBF Mammoth Fundraiser 2011

Posted in Reflections by Jonas Dupuich on March 1, 2011

GSBF Mammoth Fundraiser 2011

Last weekend the Golden State Bonsai Federation (GSBF) held simultaneous fundraisers in support of its Northern and Southern California bonsai collections. In Northern California, the GSBF held an auction Saturday and a bonsai bazaar on Sunday.

I’ve always been a fan of bonsai auctions. I’ve participated in them as a buyer, a seller, and a barker – the latter being my favorite of the three. I like auctions because they provide bonsai enthusiasts with a market for their trees and an opportunity to buy material not often found in nurseries. At the same time, they support bonsai organizations whose programs benefit the broader bonsai community.

Bonsai auctions also provide a venue in which perceptions of value are tested and measured. Are reserves too high or too low? Are buyers savvy or frenzied? Which trees are most popular? Which are least popular? How much will I spend on that oak?

GSBF had the most important elements of a successful auction in place: there were plenty of bidders, volunteers, and trees for sale. Here are a few photos from the event.

Auctioneer barking

Gordon barking

Bidders

Attentive bidders

On the auction block

Trees waiting for their turn on the block

Holding an auctrion tree up for all to see

Jay holding up a tree for all to see.

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