Bonsai Tonight

Pines and junipers at Meifu-ten

Posted in Exhibits by Jonas Dupuich on February 17, 2012

Pines and junipers at Meifu-ten

Central Japan will not run out of pine or juniper bonsai anytime soon. The trees below comprise about a fifth of the bonsai displayed at this year’s Meifu-ten in Nagoya, Japan. As a hobbyist exhibit, Meifu-ten shows off some of the best work done by local hobbyists and collectors. Although many of trees were prepped for the exhibit by professionals, the general quality isn’t quite what one finds at Taiken-ten or Kokufu-ten. That said, the material and much of the work is wonderful.

Shimpaku

Cascade shimpaku on root stand

Shimpaku

Shimpaku

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

The following six trees belong to Aichi-en customers. All of us at the nursery that week – Mr. Tanaka, the other Mr. Tanaka, Peter Tea and I, all helped pluck errant needles, wire unruly branches, oil dirty pots and arrange small tufts of moss.

Black pine

Black pine – Peter Tea prep – a very nice tree

Black pine

Black pine – one of the trees I helped prep for the exhibit

Black pine

Black pine – the tree belongs to Mr. Tanaka, a 3rd year apprentice at Aichi-en – Peter Tea prep

Black pine

Black pine – the other tree I prepped

Black pine

Black pine – Peter Tea prep

White pine

White pine – Mr. Tanaka and Peter Tea wired this tree late into the evening

Black pine

Black pine

White pine

White pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Shimpaku

Shimapaku

Red pine

Red pine

Needle juniper

Needle juniper

White pine

White pine

Black pine

Black pine

The white pine below received some extra attention. It belongs to a Daiju-en customer and had been prepared for exhibit with the front as pictured below.

White pine

White pine – intended front

I placed the tree on the stand with this front but that wasn’t good enough for Mr. Tanaka, who turned the tree to the front pictured below. As it happens, the six-sided pot and six-sided stand made the change easy. What I don’t know, is what the customer thought when he saw the resulting photo or how the tree was actually displayed at the exhibit in January.

White pine

White pine as photographed

White pine

White pine

Shimpaku

Twisty shimpaku!

Black pine

Black pine

White pine

White pine

Black pine

Black pine

White pine

White pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

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Rocky Mountain Juniper bonsai

Posted in Display by Jonas Dupuich on January 20, 2012

Rocky Mountain Juniper bonsai

One of the trees displayed at Bay Island Bonsai’s 13th annual exhibit got a lot of funny looks. It’s a Rocky Mountain juniper, Juniperus scopulorum.

Rocky Mountain juniper

Rocky Mountain Juniper

It’s not exactly “show-ready” as we like to say – the tree is only a few years out of the ground and branch pads have yet to be defined. The tree offers, however, a glimpse of how floppy the tree’s foliage can be and plenty of interesting deadwood. Maybe too interesting. The large piece of deadwood on the left looks like something an undiscerning artist found on the ground and affixed to the first tree they dug. It is, however, very naturally connected to the live part of the tree.

Deadwood

Old deadwood – evidence of an older, larger tree

If you look closely, you can easily discern the old deadwood from the new. The deadwood supporting the live part of the tree lacks the deep fissures evident on the big jin. In the photo below, the upper part of the deadwood is light in color with subtle fissures. This wood has been exposed to the elements for a while, but not for as long as the jin on the left. The lower part of the deadwood is darker in color and lacks fissures. This wood has more recently been exposed to the elements.

Deadwood

Older and newer deadwood

A few days before the exhibit, I cleaned the tree’s deadwood with a water gun and then treated it with a mixture of lime sulfur, water and sumi ink. This helped to even out the different tones of deadwood on the tree. A new pot and some bright moss completed the show prep.

Deadwood

Rocky Mountain Juniper deadwood

Moss

Moss

Why so much effort for a tree that’s not quite ready for display? Interesting deadwood, great age, and curious foliage contributed to the decision. Beyond that, the tree offers a great puzzle for aspiring bonsai stylists. In other words, what improvements can be made to the tree? There are plenty of alternatives. It’s the kind of tree I’d like to walk by in the garden for a while before making up my mind. Although I don’t know what exactly is in store for the tree’s future, I do know it will  look quite different the next time I see it in an exhibit.

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Displaying a shimpaku juniper

Posted in Display, Exhibits by Jonas Dupuich on January 17, 2012

Displaying a shimpaku juniper

Bay Island Bonsai held their 13th Annual Exhibit this past weekend at the Lakeside Garden Center in Oakland, CA. The exhibit featured a well developed shimpaku juinper.

Shimpaku

Shimpaku juniper

Before reading any further, which way do you think the tree points – to the left or to the right?

When setting up exhibits, we often start by identifying trees that point left or right and put these at the ends of each row where they can point toward the center. Cascade and semi-cascade bonsai often end up at the ends of rows as they are strongly directional trees. With the exception of formal upright bonsai, most trees tend to point or lean a bit to the left or the right. When trees point to the left, we tend to place accent or companion plants to the right in the attempt to create balanced compositions.

The apex of the shimpaku pictured above points strongly to the left, as does the first branch on that side of the tree. My inclination was to display the tree on the right and place an accent plant on the left. Daisaku Nomoto, a bonsai professional visiting from Miyazaki, Japan, however, wanted the tree placed on the left. I winced at the suggestion, and appealed to Boon. Boon seconded Nomoto’s opinion. While we stood there discussing the matter, the tree’s owner set the tree on the right. This made sense to me and I liked the resulting display.

Displayed on the right

Displayed on the right with accent and scroll

At the end of the day, I found myself very curious about the direction of the tree. Maybe if the trunk or branches were arranged differently I could see what Boon and Nomoto saw. The next morning I asked Boon and Nomoto for an explanation. Simply put, they typically find the movement in the lower part of the trunk to be the most important element in the determination of direction. What about the apex or the key branch? Not important, Nomoto replied. It really is all about the lower part of the trunk. Tilting the tree a bit to the right would increase the movement of the lower part of the trunk and move the apex to the right. Growing out the lowest branch on the right could further this movement.

What does the tree look like displayed on the left?

Displayed on the left

As displayed on the left

Turns out the tree looks good on the left too.

Armed with new knowledge, I found a new way to look at bonsai. Like the Ponderosa pine below, for instance. Surely it points to the right?

Ponderosa pine

Ponderosa pine

No such luck. Nomoto insisted the tree points to the left, just as the owner had displayed it.

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Witnessed in a recent workshop – grafting follow-up and junipers

Posted in Bonsai Development by Jonas Dupuich on July 29, 2011

Witnessed in a recent workshop – grafting follow-up and junipers

You can’t have too many branches on ume – or at least I can’t. Getting ume to ramify has proved difficult for me. I made several grafts this year and fortunately most of them took. See “Ume – cutback and grafting” for details about the grafting process. My job now is to help the scions develop. To do this, I cut back the branches onto which the scions have been grafted.

Ume - July 2011

Ume – before cutback

Ume - after cutback

Ume – after cutback

I’ve left the grafting tape in place to keep the scions secure while they are fusing. If the branches continue to grow well, I’ll remove the tape in fall.

New graft

Grafting tape holding scion in place

The following photos show the new scions and the original branches onto which they have been grafted. The new shoots look a lot like the old shoots – why have I bothered? The new shoots bear fragrant white flowers – the old shoots, double pink.

New graft

Scion on left, original branches on right

New graft

Original branch on the left, healthy scion on the right

While I worked on the ume, I noticed both large and small junipers taking shape. Jeff brought in the big juniper below for a tune up.

Big juniper

Getting the tree into place

Juniper

Prostrata juniper

A much smaller juniper was showing some real progress. The shari had been added to make the trunk more interesting and the branch pads were developing well, showing off the shimpaku foliage to great effect.

Shimpaku

Shimpaku

Shari

Shari – note how the curves exaggerate the natural flow of the trunk

Branch pad

Branch pad showing good ramification

While I was inspecting the shimpaku, Boon called me over to witnes a sap bubble that formed where a shoot was cut on a black pine. Apparently this happens occasionally on hot days.

A bubble of sap after decandling on a warm day

Sap bubble

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