Bonsai Tonight

Repotting young cork bark black pines

Posted in Bonsai Development by Jonas Dupuich on March 3, 2015

Repotting recently grafted young pines is just like repotting non-grafted pines, only additional care is taken to avoid damaging the union.

Repotting corkbark black pine

Grafted cork bark black pine

Repotting corkbark black pine

After removing the pot

Note the white spot – there are signs of root adelgid infestation. For those curious to see how mycorrhiza differs in appearance from adelgid infestation, see below.

Mycorrhiza

Mycorrhiza – and lots of it

Simply coming out the roots cleared away most of the affected area so I didn’t spray pesticides to address the adelgids.

Repotting corkbark black pine

After combing out the roots

I planted the pine in a colander.

Repotting corkbark black pine

Nestling the tree onto a mound of soil.

Once the tree was in place, I tied it in and added more soil. Using chopsticks, I worked the new soil in between the roots.

Repotting corkbark black pine

Before chopstick work

Repotting corkbark black pine

After chopstick work – notice the level of the soil has dropped

I then added soil to fill the pot and tamped it into place.

Repotting corkbark black pine

Repotting complete

 

Cork bark black pine from graft – follow up

Posted in Bonsai Development by Jonas Dupuich on February 27, 2015

Two years ago, I started a few cork bark black pines by grafting (See “Creating cork bark black pine“). The grafts took, and that fall I began reducing the foliage on the host tree.

Now, one year later, it’s time to repeat the process. Both the scions and their hosts grew well last year, so I need to further reduce the regular black pine foliage to encourage the cork bark foliage.

I began by reducing the branches, leaving only one shoot on each tree. I then removed some needles. When there were branches growing above the scion that might shade it, I removed these branches first. The idea is to slow down the host tree and to provide the scion with as much sunshine as possible. Here’s what the process looked like for three young trees.

Corkbark pine

Cork bark black pine – 2 years after grafting

Corkbark pine

The scion

I left the grafting tape in place when I removed the grafting bag as it can help keep the scion in place while the union strengthens.

Corkbark pine

After removing one of the original branches

Corkbark pine

After removing a second branch

With the branches out of the way, I removed all of the old needles and a few new needles from the last remaining original shoot.

Corkbark pine

After removing needles

Here’s the same process repeated for two more trees.

Corkbark pine

2-year old cork bark black pine – the host tree is now five years old

Corkbark pine

After removing branches

Corkbark pine

After removing needles

Corkbark pine

Tree number 3

Corkbark pine

After removing branches and pulling old needles

Once the the cutback and clean-up was done, I repotted the trees – details next time.

Yaupon holly – before and after

Posted in Before and after by Jonas Dupuich on February 24, 2015

It’s fun to see where bonsai come from. The journeys trees make from seed, layer, graft, cutting or point of collection can be subtle or dramatic. Rapid or dramatic changes are exciting, but continued improvement plays no less important a role in the creation of bonsai.

Following a tree’s history can also be informative. People who’ve been at it for a while can see how others approach similar work, and people with less experience may be able to catch a glimpse of what they’re getting into when they bring a tree home.

I’ve posted the mid-point of a project to develop a Yaupon holly and the progress to date below.

Yaupon holly

Half way there – January 2009

Yaupon holly
September 2014

I’ve added additional steps along the way at Ask Bonsai Tonight in hopes that others will do the same. I encourage anyone interested to share their progress to date and provide updates as the progress continues. Thanks to Boon for the suggestion.

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Fall work at Shinpukuji Bonsai Museum

Posted in Excursions by Jonas Dupuich on February 20, 2015

Last fall, Boon Manakitivipart brought a student from Thailand to work with him at Shinpukuji Bonsai Museum.

Chinese quince

Removing leaves from a Chinese quince

Some of the work involved removing leaves from deciduous varieties including quince and trident maple.

Trident maple

Trident maple

Trident maple

After removing the leaves

Trident maple

Another trident maple with leaves removed

Fall is also a great time for working on black pines.

Black pine

Black pine

Black pine

After removing last year’s needles and wiring

Trunk detail

Trunk detail – what bark!

In addition to the museum’s outdoor display is an indoor display that often features seasonal trees like the Stauntonia below.

Mube - Stauntonia hexaphylla

Stauntonia hexaphylla – “mube” in Japanese

Euonymous

Euonymous

Kuchinashi - gardenia

Gardenia

A perennial favorite of Mr. Oomura’s is princess persimmon. Few gardens anywhere have the depth of the princess persimmon collection at Shinpukuji.

Princess persimmon

Princess persimmon

Princess persimmon

Princess persimmon

Trees not currently on display reside in Mr. Oomura’s garden. In addition to the museum pieces, Mr. Oomura’s collection includes many trees in development like the spruce below.

Spruce

Spruce

Black pine

Black pine

Trident maple

Trident maple

For those who haven’t had the chance to visit, here are a few shots of the temple grounds.

Shinpukuji Temple

Stair in front of the main hall

Shinpukuji Temple

Gate

Shinpukuji Temple

Wooden shrine

Shinpukuji Temple

Fall color

Thanks again to Boon Manakitivipart for the photos.

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